Sunday, October 17, 2010

Texting Changing Communication Conversation

The average 13 to 17 year sends and receives over 100 text messages a day. A recent PEW study has found that in general people who text (often the youngsters) prefer to text over making a phone call. It does save people time for example, rather than having to make a phone call where you could diverge into small talk when all you want to say is that you will be at the meeting. Yet, the study also says that because texting is so simple and convenient people tend to do it often in their spare time, when they could otherwise be basking in quiet reflection. Understanding the pervasiveness of texting in our young culture, it makes me wonder how texting is or could be changing the global business world, education, and citizenship.

8 comments:

paulmartin42 said...

I am relaxed about students using cellphones, their disadvantage is screen-size. Focus on their in/out going msgs is good but a large screen PC has more bandwidth...

Anonymous said...

I find it a double edged sword.some are using it for note taking while others are just communicating to their friends.

Anonymous said...

I believe that while texting can be good in someways, it should not replace that art of conversation. Some teenagers do not know how to put their cellphone down and actually talk to the people in the room with them (I'm not saying that all of them do this).

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Anonymous said...

The biggest negative to texting among teens is that accepted text abbreviations are used so often,they try to use them in written assignments - a definite "no no" in the English class!
Interestingly, I worked at a school where texting was used to communicate between office/ administration/teachers.

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